EDITORIAL: Who’s Responsible for Healthy Choices?

Staff Editorial

This year when you go into the lunch line all you ever want is pizza, French fries and a soda, skip the salad, hold the dressing, and keep the extra change for the same lunch tomorrow. But do you jump into line thinking that you’re going to buy the most unhealthy, artery clogging, greasy food? Because it is also cheap and so delicious. You could possibly be thinking, “I would love to buy something healthy, but there are only two types of salad and they are way too expensive for me; I’ll just stick with the fries…”

It is our responsibility, if we are given options, to make smart choices. The healthy food shouldn’t be more expensive, and the fries should not be so much cheaper. It is the students’ responsibility because the cafeteria currently has a light system to display healthy choices. The bad foods have a red light while the healthier foods have green ones. Therefore, students are fully aware of what kind of food they are purchasing when they pick it up.

However, it is a communal effort. All the food should be priced reasonably priced, but it’s our responsibility to make the right choice and the school’s responsibility to provide a health conscious lunch provider. There are two types of salad in the cafeteria and yet many more unhealthy choices, you can have your pick of fries, ham or cheese burgers, maybe even a chicken sandwich or some pizza. Students are limited in their nutritional choices, and the unhealthy foods always seem to be more favorable, in terms of cost, taste and presentation. A lot of kids in America have this same problem because the choice is there but the decision is so hard to make. The cafeteria needs more choices not just pizza, French fries or a Caesar salad. Sure, it is our responsibility, but if we have no healthy options then what are we supposed to do? There are only two types of salad, garden or Caesar but there can be more choices like rice, baked chicken and vegetables. The school needs to provide us with the options so that we can make the choice to eat healthier. Students are never happy when options are limited. Last year, the cafeteria limited us to choosing fries only two times a week, but at least we were forced to eat healthier.

Of course, the salads are expensive because fresh vegetables will always be more expensive than grease soaked fries and a lot of this has to do with the state of the economy. In the cafeteria, you can buy a chicken sandwich, soda and fries or a Caesar salad. The healthier option? The salad, of course. The cheaper option? The unhealthier choice, no doubt, the chicken sandwich with fries plus a soda. It is more food and less money but a lot more calories, fat and definitely less healthier than the salad option.

In our cafeteria, the bad stuff looks better. You walk into the cafeteria; the pizza is glowing radiantly under a light while the healthier options sit on top looking a lot less appetizing. You even have to make a conscience effort to stop and look for those healthy little entrees. Do you want a healthy meal? How about just a few pieces from it, like just the chicken or the vegetables alone? Sorry, you can’t, try buying the whole meal because that’s your only option. Collectively, the staff thinks that Sage wants our money for those cost effective, unhealthy foods they provide, but the school really is concerned about our health which is why the administration changed to this company.

The biggest thing that the staff was concerned about was the options provided and the variety of the healthy foods given. What ever happened to the Paninis?! If a wider variety was given, then we would not be arguing about this in the first place. Ultimately, students need to take care of themselves; you cannot rely on someone to hold your hand and make the right decision for you. Grow up and make a decision. Bring your lunch, pay the extra few dollars for a salad, or even talk to administration about having some more healthy choices in the cafeteria. You could even opt to buy the unhealthiness, because health costs. Bottom line, it really is your choice and although the healthy options are limited, they are available, so make the best decision for yourself!

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s