Post-Mubarak Egypt Votes

Egypt takes democratic steps to a promising new government

Emily Magruder ‘13 | Staff Writer

Voters received a fingerprint after voting in the elections. (Source: Flickr Commons)

Democratic elections in Egypt  took place November 28, 2011, signaling an end to a dramatic uprising that began 11 months earlier.

In recent history, Egypt has had a violent track record in regards to their government. Protests derived from various qualms with the socio-economic and religious conditions in Egypt escalated from non-violent strikes and demonstrations to rowdy, chaotic riots. This uprising started January 25, 2011.

Since the Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak resigned February 11, 2011, the Egyptian military has directed the country. However, these elections may designate a new political power to run the Egyptian government.

After much apprehension about these elections, it appears to have gone peacefully, excluding a reported 25 minor injuries from jostling in the crowds. Long lines, some approximately 3 miles long, and few security issues were reported by BBC News. The military even accommodated voters who had to travel long distances to reach the polls in Cairo by extending the voting time by two hours.

Preliminary voting results were publicized on Wednesday, November 30th. The results showed that 60% of Egyptians voted in support of the Islamic party. The Muslim Brotherhood, one of the primary supporters of the 2011 Egyptian Revolution, accumulated 36.6% of the votes. These Islamic institutions plan to continue non-violent democratic efforts.

Although some people remain concerned for the future of the Egyptian government, U.S. History teacher Shawn Dougherty said, “If we are truly about exporting democracy, which is all about the will of the majority, we must let them decide what is right for them.”

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